Zach V. Thomas

The Olathe Criminal Defense Lawyer

Violent Crimes (Felony Charges)

Felony charges of Robbery and Burglary carry far larger issues. In Kansas, a defendant charged with a felony is scored on the criminal history guideline (A to I with A being the most severe). The more criminal history one has, the higher the potential sentence. Kansas distinguishes between person and non-person felonies. If you have 3 or more non-person felonies, you’re scored a criminal history E. If you have just one person felony, your criminal history score is a D. Two person felonies makes you a Criminal History “B”. Three person felonies makes you a criminal history “A”. The sentencing ranges for folks with an A-D score are most presumptive prison.

Therefore, if you have had person felonies in the past, or if you’re charged with person felonies now (burglary, robbery, aggravated battery, rape, etc) it is important to hire a lawyer with experience in defending against these felony charges. Additionally, prior to sentencing in a felony case, it’s important to review the criminal history with a lawyer who knows how challenge past crimes so that your criminal history score is as minimal as possible. (For instance, burglaries in states other than Kansas can be considered non-person felonies but your criminal history score may still show them as a person felony).

Call me to ensure you speak with a lawyer that has the knowledge and experience to properly address these issues.

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  • Violent Crimes STATUTE
  • 21-5412. Assault; aggravated assault; assault of a law enforcement officer; aggravated assault of a law enforcement officer.
    (a) Assault is knowingly placing another person in reasonable apprehension of immediate bodily harm;

    (b) Aggravated assault is assault, as defined in subsection (a), committed:

    (1) With a deadly weapon;
    (2) while disguised in any manner designed to conceal identity; or
    (3) with intent to commit any felony.

    (c) Assault of a law enforcement officer is assault, as defined in subsection (a), committed against:

    (1) A uniformed or properly identified state, county or city law enforcement officer while such officer is engaged in the performance of such officer's duty; or
    (2) a uniformed or properly identified university or campus police officer while such officer is engaged in the performance of such officer's duty.